Biography

Ross Hendy

Ph.D Student


Biography

Research Topic

The topic of Ross' PhD research project is to examine the way in which routinely unarmed police officers resolve conflict in their day-to-day work. The study will look at police-citizen interactions in England, New Zealand, and Norway using a mixed method approach. Ross' PhD research is being supervised by Dr. Justice Tankebe.

Education

2014-2016  Dawes Scholar
Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
2013-2016  PhD Candidate, Wakefield Scholar
Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom
2009-2011  Master of Strategic Studies (M.S.S.) (Merit)
School of Government, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
Thesis topic: The strategic impact of routinely arming the New Zealand Police
1992-1994  Bachelor of Music, Composition (B.Mus)
School of Music, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand

Awards & Distinctions

2014-2016  Dawes Scholar, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge
2013-2016  Wakefield Scholar, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge

Publications

  • Hendy, R. (2014). Routinely Armed and Unarmed Police: What can the Scandinavian Experience Teach us? Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice. 8(2) 183-192.

Research Interests

  • Intelligence Studies
  • Police Legitimacy
  • Police Use of Force
  • Policing
  • Policing Studies
  • Strategic Studies

Conference Presentations

2014  Conflict Resolution techniques by routinely unarmed police officers: a practitioner's consideration of the literature presented at the inaugural Perspectives on Conflict conference, 6 June 2014, University of Glasgow.
2013  Exploring the Strategic Impact of Routine Arming the New Zealand Police presented at Issues in Crime and Justice, June 2013, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
2012  Exploring the Strategic Impact of Routine Arming the New Zealand Police presented at Australia New Zealand Society of Criminology, Annual Conference November 2012, University of Auckland, New Zealand