Biography

Professor David Farrington

Emeritus Professor of Psychological Criminology


Biography

David P. Farrington, O.B.E., is Emeritus Professor of Psychological Criminology, and Leverhulme Trust Emeritus Fellow at the Institute of Criminology, Cambridge University. He received the Stockholm Prize in Criminology, and the Freda Adler Distinguished Scholar Award of the American Society of Criminology Division of International Criminology, in 2013, and he will receive the Vollmer Award of the American Society of Criminology in 2014. He is a Fellow of the British Academy, of the Academy of Medical Sciences, of the British Psychological Society, of the American Society of Criminology, of the Association for Psychological Science, and of the International Society for Research on Aggression. He is also an Honorary Fellow of the British Psychological Society, and an Honorary Life Member of the British Society of Criminology and of the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology. He is a Chartered Forensic Psychologist, Chair of the Division of Developmental and Life-Course Criminology of the American Society of Criminology, a member of the Board of Directors of the International Observatory on Violence in Schools, a member of the Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group Steering Committee, joint editor of the journal Criminal Behaviour and Mental Health, and a member of the editorial boards of 16 other journals. He has been President of the American Society of Criminology (the first and only person from outside North America to be elected to this office), President of the European Association of Psychology and Law, President of the British Society of Criminology, President of the Academy of Experimental Criminology, Chair of the Division of Forensic Psychology of the British Psychological Society, Vice-Chair of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Panel on Violence, Co-chair of the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Study Groups on Serious and Violent Juvenile Offenders and on Very Young Offenders, Co-Chair of the Campbell Collaboration Crime and Justice Group, Co-chair of the U.S. National Institute of Justice Study Group on Transitions from Juvenile Delinquency to Adult Crime, Co-chair of the Centre for Disease Control's Expert Panel on Protective Factors against Youth Violence, Chair of the U.K. Department of Health Advisory Committee for the National Programme on Forensic Mental Health, Chair of the Board of Examiners in Forensic Psychology of the British Psychological Society, Co-chair of the High Security Psychiatric Services Commissioning Board (U.K. Department of Health) Network on Primary Prevention of Adult Antisocial Behaviour, Acting Director of the Cambridge University Institute of Criminology, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Panel on Criminal Career Research, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences Committee on Assessing the Research Programme of the National Institute of Justice, Visiting Fellow at the U.S. National Institute of Justice, Visiting Fellow at the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics, and a member of the National Parole Board for England and Wales. He has received B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from Cambridge University, an honorary degree of Sc.D. from Trinity College, University of Dublin, the Sellin-Glueck Award of the American Society of Criminology for international contributions to criminology, the Sutherland Award of the American Society of Criminology for outstanding contributions to criminology, the European Association of Psychology and Law Award for Outstanding Career-Long Contributions to the Scientific Study of Law and Human Behaviour, the Joan McCord Award of the Academy of Experimental Criminology for Distinguished Contributions to Life-Course Criminology, the Jerry Lee Award of the American Society of Criminology Division of Experimental Criminology, for life-time achievements in experimental criminology, the Robert Boruch Award of the Campbell Collaboration for Contributions to Research that Informs Public Policy, the Beccaria Gold Medal of the Criminology Society of German-Speaking Countries, the Senior Prize of the British Psychological Society Division of Forensic Psychology, the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Outstanding Contributions Award and the Hermann Mannheim Prize of the International Centre for Comparative Criminology. His major research interest is in developmental criminology, and he is Director of the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development, which is a prospective longitudinal survey of over 400 London males from age 8 to age 56. He is also co-Investigator of the Pittsburgh Youth Study, which is a prospective longitudinal study of over 1,500 Pittsburgh males from age 7 to age 35. In addition to over 600 published journal articles and book chapters on criminological and psychological topics, he has published 96 books, monographs and government publications.

May 22, 2014